Good Food Slow Cooked Lamb Curry with Cloves and Cardamom

Magazine: Good Food
Issue: September 2013
Recipe Rating:
3
Difficulty Rating:
3

Notes

September 2013's BBC Good Food Magazine ties in neatly with Rick Stein's broadcast series on the cuisine of India. This particular recipe has been brought back to the UK by Rick after encountering the charming Mr Singh who we can thank for this rich and spicy concoction.

The recipe calls for slow cooked boned lamb shoulder (available from all supermarkets) and certainly requires careful planning if you are intent upon sitting down at a set time. I would heartily recommend an element of flexibility since we didn't sit down to eat any time close to what I had calculated when I started this epic.

There are disappointments - Rick is suggesting the use of Kashmiri chilli powder which has a mild / medium heat. But despite living in west London with many specialist shops around me, I was unable to source the spice. So if I can't obtain it, then how on earth does Rick think the burghers of Grange-over-Sands and other provincial villages will succeed?

The curry is very solid and thick which may not appeal to all either - very reminiscent of the old 'yes I'll have a slice please' gag. On the whole I would rate the curry a success, but not unconditionally.

Changes from Published Recipe

The intention was to stay as close to the recipe as possible, although as previously mentioned I could not source the Kashmiri chilli powder so went for some hot chilli powder instead.

Rick suggests that the fried onion purée will turn golden after 10-15 frying - well it didn't for me. It stayed steadfastly white for me. I cut down the garlic cloves from ten to seven since it looked like overkill, and I could still smell the garlic on myself 24 hours later - so be careful with this.

I would concur with the addition of 300ml of water which was the exact amount needed to cover the meat. The final 30 minutes (thankfully) wasn't needed to reduce the sauce further since it was already thick and gloopy.